Graffiti

A labor of love from 2007. The objective is to become the greatest and most prolific artist, rising from toy to king.
The gameplay needs refining but it's not too far from functional at this point.

 

 

First edition of Graffiti. Acrylic on panel.
This oversized version measured 22 by 32 inches.

Second edition of Graffiti. Marker on paper. While the third edition includes the parking lot, I think it works better with two alley ways.

In designing the third edition, my intent was to lay down divisions and spaces without giving the feel of lines laid on top of a world.

In designing the third edition, my intent was to lay down divisions and spaces without giving the feel of lines laid on top of a world.

 

Street corner

Parking lot entrance

Alley way

Intersection

 

Warehouse

Paint Store

Convenient Store

Office

 
Movement cards and player tokens.

Movement cards and player tokens.

 
Third edition gameplay sample using a pawn from the first edition and a cop car from the second.

Third edition gameplay sample using a pawn from the first edition and a cop car from the second.

 

 

Franchise

The object of Franchise is to open the most successful franchises.  From 2006.

 
Concept for the five dollar man. Magritte and such. As well as the first five dollar bill design.

Concept for the five dollar man. Magritte and such. As well as the first five dollar bill design.

 
Franchise card back.

Franchise card back.

Franchise began as a solitaire-type game played with a regular deck of cards. Face cards were customers and number cards became locations and money. After getting frustrated with the limitations of a regular deck, I thought, "Wait, why not just design a deck?" I had a year and a half of design school behind me and made just as many mistakes as one might imagine.

At this point, the gameplay feels like it might work better as a tile laying game but I learned quite a lot along the way. Perhaps the biggest lesson was to spend less time on design before the gameplay is functional.

And when it came to the mechanics, it seemed I had forgotten one of the most important parts about approaching anything creative: start broad and work your way into the details.

Freshman year of high school, our art instructor had us sculpt before we put pencil to paper. In sculpture it's impossible to start detailing a chin while convincing yourself you don't see the giant square block it's attached to. If forces the artist to start with the basic shapes first.

Instead of building Franchise from a set of basic, broad mechanics and then work in further details, I would end up getting a certain set of rules down and then find out I had to adjust or abandon another finely tuned set. From that point on I've strived to always start with the basic 'shapes'.

 

The Restaurants

White background is fast food. Colored background is a sit-down location.
Each has their benefits and challenges.

 

Blue group

Purple group

Before I learned how awful Papyrus is.

Red group

Named for a family dog.

Orange group

Green group

Ochre group

 

Gray Locations

Gray Locations create or attract customers.

 

Gas attracts customers. Only one fast food restaurant can benefit directly.

In one version, the business park increased lunch crowds.

Mall attracts customers. Several restaurants can benefit.

Greatest customer spawn. Nine restaurants can benefit directly.

Second best customer spawn location. In one version, created the most families.

The college. Only fast food restaurants benefit directly.

 

Money Cards

 

1 and 5

10 and 20

Early edition playtest. The grid mat is unnecessary.

Early edition playtest. The grid mat is unnecessary.

 

 

Pirates

Still in early development, but has some promising gameplay mechanics.

 
piratePlay.jpg